Monday, October 2, 2017

On the Road with Alternative Transportation

Kyle from the American Association of Owner Operators saw one of our trucks on the road recently and emailed us a picture he took. 

Kyle wrote us to let us know he was thrilled that the driver had alternative transportation with him and was taking the initiative to stay healthy.

The American Association of Owner Operators has a YouTube channel that has "tons of videos on exercises" and recipes you can make that are easy and healthy.  Best of all, it's all free!  Check it out by clicking here.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Message from a Former Driver

We received a contact form from the Schilli website that a former driver filled out.  Here's what he had to say:

I retired from Schilli Specialized a few years ago. Worked for them for about 4 years. In 38 years I have drove for many trucking companies. I honestly can say Schilli was the best.

When I needed to be home, I got home. If you treated them right, they treated you right. If you had a complaint, you could talk to the Terminal Mgr. and work to resolve the problem. You didn't have to stay in your truck if it was in for service at the shop, you could go on your break and they put you up in a motel. If you want to run and get miles they would accommodate you, no problem.
Drivers always have something to complain about but with my experience they were the best of all that I ever worked for. Did I ever complain? Yes, my dispatcher and I didn't see eye to eye. I asked for a different one and I got one. Did I always get home on Friday for my week end? Not always but they do try.
Remember there are things that aren't always going to go your way but that's the trucking business period. Many things that go wrong are usually not your company's fault.
So that's my story and you have my permission to publish this without my last name.

Thanks

Charles "Jerry"

Monday, August 28, 2017

4 Mistakes While Driving Near Trucks



Semitrailer trucks aren’t nearly as maneuverable as passenger vehicles, and they take a lot longer to stop. The Arkansas State Police advises motorists to avoid making these four common — and dangerous — mistakes near big trucks:
  
  1. Cutting off a truck in traffic or on the highway to reach an exit or turn, or cutting into the open space in front of a truck. This removes the truck driver’s cushion of safety. Trying to beat a truck to a single-lane construction zone, for instance, represents a particularly dangerous situation. Take a moment to slow down and exit behind the truck. It will only take a few extra seconds.
  2. Lingering alongside a truck when passing. Always pass a tractor-trailer completely and on the left side. If you linger when passing a truck, your position makes it impossible for the truck driver to take evasive action if an obstacle appears in the road ahead.
  3. Following closely behind a truck when you can’t see the truck driver’s rear-view mirrors. In this situation, there is no way the truck driver can see you. Tailgating a truck or car is also dangerous because you take away your own cushion of safety if the vehicle in front of you stops suddenly. Additionally, if the vehicle you’re following hits something in the road, you have no time to react before it hits the front of your car.
  4. Underestimating the size and speed of an approaching tractor-trailer. Because of its size, a tractor-trailer often appears to be traveling at a slower speed than it is. A large number of car-truck collisions take place at intersections because the driver of the car doesn’t realize how close the truck is or how quickly it’s approaching.
  Article from truckinginfo.com.Click here for the original article.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Schilli Companies Join Daseke

Dear Schilli Company Team Members,

I am so very excited to announce that effective May 1, 2017 the Schilli Companies have joined forces with the Daseke family of carriers.

This is an exciting next chapter in the history of our company and one that holds many benefits for all of us. The decision to merge with Daseke was not taken lightly and was guided by my desire to continue the journey of excellence that we’ve been on for many years. By joining Daseke we have joined a unique and wonderful family of open deck specialized carriers. Together we can enhance our services and create opportunities for both our team members and the amazing collection of companies that we’re proud to call our customer. For you and your position within Schilli, all remains the same, including conditions of employment, pay and seniority.

The Daseke philosophy is to invest in great people, provide them with the resources they need to succeed, and then step back and let them run the business. As I’ve said on many occasions it is our team members that have allowed us to achieve the many successes we’ve had and I would never jeopardize our relationships. After a great deal of due diligence I assure you that our merger with Daseke is a great match and fulfills my commitment to provide growth opportunity to all.

Most importantly, our company’s leadership, management, and brand will remain the same with one exception. We are adding Lee Michaud as the President of the Transportation Companies. It will be business as usual except that we will be part of a focused team of sister companies who have a culture of collaboration. Like us, they are considered the best in the open deck specialized industry.

The Schilli Companies will continue to stand autonomously to best support our customers and team members. A merger with Daseke has never eliminated a position! In fact by merging, we are setting ourselves up for the potential for even faster growth.

Daseke Inc. is currently comprised of:
  • Smokey Point Distributing, based in Arlington, Washington (www.spdtrucking.com)
  • E.W. Wylie Corporation, based in West Fargo, North Dakota (www.wylietrucking.com)
  • J. Grady Randolph, based in Gaffney, South Carolina (www.jgr-inc.com)
  • Central Oregon Truck Company, based in Redmond, Oregon (www.centraloregontruck.com)
  • Boyd Companies, based in Clayton, Alabama (www.boydbros.com)
  • WTI Transport, based in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (www.wtitransport.com)
  • Lone Star Transportation, based in Fort Worth, Texas (www.lonestar-llc.com)
  • Bulldog Hiway Express, based in Charleston, South Carolina (www.bulldoghiway.com)
  • Hornady Transportation, based in Monroeville, Alabama (www.hornadytransportation.com)

These quality companies and the professional drivers behind the wheel are now our new brothers and sisters out on the road. I’m so excited about the future and the opportunities this merger creates as we collectively build North America’s premier open deck specialized carrier.

Our exciting journey continues stronger than ever.

Tom Schilli
CEO

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Vehicle Maintenance Tips for Summer Heat

With temperatures in many parts of the country climbing into triple digits in recent days, AAA is reminding drivers that the risk of engines overheating, older batteries failing and tire troubles grows with each day of a heat wave.
“The effect this kind of weather can have on your car is cumulative so we expect to see an uptick in calls for roadside rescues,” said Tammy Arnette, senior public affairs specialist for AAA.

Proper vehicle maintenance is crucial to help avoid a breakdown in high temperatures. AAA offers these reminders:
  • Test your battery and, if necessary, replace it before it dies. Most batteries last three to five years and each day of extreme weather pushes a battery closer to its end.  
  • Make sure tires are properly inflated. Driving on under-inflated tires can cause tires to overheat and increase the likelihood of a blowout. This problem becomes even more of a concern when road temperatures are extremely high. Tires should be checked when the vehicle has not been driven recently, and they should be inflated to the pressure recommended by the vehicle manufacturer — not the number molded into the tire sidewall. Recommended tire pressures can be found in the owner’s manual or on a sticker normally located on the driver’s door jamb or the inside of the glove compartment door. Some vehicles use different pressures for the front and rear tires. While checking the tire pressure — including the spare — drivers also should inspect the tire treads for adequate depth and any signs of uneven wear that might indicate a suspension or alignment problem.
  • Check all fluids. When fluid levels are low, the possibility of overheating increases. Drivers should check all vehicle fluids including motor oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid and brake fluid to ensure they are filled to the appropriate levels. If any fluids need to be topped off, be sure to use the type of fluid specified in the owner’s manual.
  • Stock a summer emergency roadside kit. Even with proper preventive maintenance, summer breakdowns can still occur, so AAA recommends every driver have a fully charged cell phone on hand so they can call for help. Also needed is a well-stocked emergency kit to ensure everyone’s safety while they’re waiting for help to arrive. Emergency roadside kits should include water, non-perishable food items, jumper cables, a flashlight with extra batteries, road flares or an emergency beacon, basic hand tools and a first-aid kit.

While many of the maintenance tasks to prepare a car for extreme summer heat can be performed by the average driver, some are best left to a trained automotive technician, AAA stressed.

To see the article in Automotive Fleet, click here.